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How to reach and engage the Millennial target audience – a RTNA workshop

 RADIO T V NEWS ASSOCIATION, RTNA media workshop on Millennials.

(L-R) Britt Hysen, Editor, Millennial Mag.; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS 2/KCAL 9 TV News; KNX Business Hour Host, Frank Mottek; Judy Muller, USC professor and Paul Glickman, Senior Editor, KPCC Radio at RTNA “State of the News Business 2016: Focus on Millennials” media workshop in Beverly HIlls, CA.                                                                                 (Story was first published on Examiner.com)

Radio, TV and Media experts got a wakeup call last night (Wed., April 27, 2016), at a Radio TV News Association (RTNA) “State-of-the-Industry” workshop focusing on “Millennials”.  “If you want to target the Millennials, you have to go to them said Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder/editor-in-chief of Millennial Magazine. The magazine was named one of the “top 100 Most Influential Digital Media Sites for Millennials,” by the White House. According to the Pew Research Center and U.S. Census Bureau, Millennials, whom we define as those ages 18-34 in 2015, now number 75.4 million, jumping ahead of the 74.9 million Baby Boomers (ages 51-69). And Generation X (ages 35-50 in 2015) is projected to pass the Boomers in population by 2028. “Millennials are so bombarded with information they need a break, and if you want to get their attention, you need to go to them on their platforms,” said Hysen.

RTNA

Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder & editor-in-chief, MiLLENiAL Magazine talks about myths and reality about Millennials.

Hysen said the Millennials watch Youtube, Snapchat, Periscope, Reddit.com, Facebook Live, and Twitter to get their info, and she said they want lifestyle news, short raw stories, real human emotions, inspirational stories and posts, but 50 percent of Millennials also want hard news. Hysen also noted the younger audience wants less celebrity news. The RTNA media panel also included Moderator Frank Mottek, host, KNX Business hour; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS2/KCAL-9; Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC Radio and Judy Muller, USC Professor.

Bill Dallman, V.P. & news director, CBS2/KCAL 9 offered TV and radio newsrooms advice about hiring in TV industry jobs. “Don’t hire interns to do your social media, because you need an intern for each social media channel,” he told the RTNA event audience. “I have a lot of job candidates who want to work in the TV news business and some don’t even own a TV. All media outlets need to hire more Millennials.” All panelists agree the younger generation bring cultural and technology skills right out of school. Many have become citizen journalists. USC Professor Judy Mullen said she started a new journalism class on “critical thinking skills, where students analyze articles for logic and sources.” She also said she consider naming the course, “Detecting Crap.”

“The Millennial audience is the magic bullet that we don’t have, “said Dallman at CBS/KCAL TV. “We thought we had a situation where people growing up were our best ali, that they would want more TV news as they got older, but now we have all these apps such as smartphones, IPad, apps, computers and the Internet. Now, it’s a much bigger battle.” Thanks to the Internet and technology, TV and Radio stations have been forced to adjust making everything that goes over the air is also online. “The Internet was supposed to kill us, and it didn’t,” said Dallman. “It made us stronger, but the phone apps might kill us as we see Millennials always staring down at their phones.”

Millennials panelists

(L-R) Moderator Frank Mottek, KNX Business Hour; Judy Muller, USC Professor; Founder/Editor Britt Hysen; Bill Dallman, KCBS/KCAL TV News and Paul Glickman, KPCC Radio.

Dallman was asked about a new trends where celebrities are interviewing newsmakers like Actor/Directors like Sean Penn interviewing a Drug Lord El Chapo, and Spike Lee interviewing Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders.
“I think everyone is trying to get into the media, they want to be producers, for example Basketball Star Kolby Bryant wants to start his own production company, and they all want a piece of that pie, because that’s where the influencers are,” he explained. “They want to own the company that creates the media. It’s a natural progression for people who have been on that side of the camera most of their lives to want to be on the other side.”

Millennials focus

(L-R) Aida Mayho, Pres. & CEO, MAYO Communications, LA; Sylvia Hysen and her daughter and founder/editor Britt Hysen, MiLLENiAL Magazine at RTNA workshop.

The biggest shift in the news and media business shows that Millennials want to be part of the conversation and love audio apps like Soundcloud, but the newest hottest online trend are podcasts. “They do want to be part of the conversation,” said Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC, which is one of the first in the country to offer Podcasts of their on-air news and programs. “Millennials are the prime demographic for watching, reading and listening to the news,” said Britt Hysen. “If you don’t attract those who are in their 20’s and 30’s right now, who’s going to be watching, listening and reading in the future?”  Hysen noted that some of the biggest misconceptions about Millennials is that they’re “lazy, entitled, disenfranchised, and superficial, which is true of any generation,” she said.

“At Millennial Magazine we dispel all those misconceptions about Millennials,” explained Hysen. “We’re promoting the unsung heroes, the social impact, wellness articles, the ‘How to’ stories and cultural trends of this generation. Millennial is a media lifestyle brand showcasing global millennial influencers that reflects the habits of a conscious consumer – eco-friendly, globally connected, experience driven, and entrepreneurial,” she said. “From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree

“From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree to these opinions and observations by the media panelists feel free to weigh in with your comments. For more photos visit: https://goo.gl/hRE3r3.

Celebrity Journalist Jamie Foster Brown recalls private moments with Prince

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - APRIL 21: A woman lays flowers at a memorial for Prince outside First Avenue nightclub on April 21, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prince died earlier today at his Paisley Park compound at the age of 57. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

A woman lays flowers at a memorial for Prince outside First Avenue nightclub on April 21, 2016, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prince died earlier Thursday at his Paisley Park compound at the age of 57. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Doctors treated Prince for a drug overdose just six days before his death, TMZ reported late Thursday citing multiple unnamed sources.

The seven-time Grammy winner, best known for his wild personality and powerful songwriting that helped define pop music, was found unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate and studio in Minnesota. An autopsy on Friday will help determine the exact cause of death, though information won’t be available for several days, even weeks.

Jamie Brown

Jamie Brown, one of Prince’s best friends and publisher of Sister-2-Sister Magazine.

Prince produced more than 25 albums and sold more than 100 million albums. His first was in the 1970’s “For You” and he defined his own music career. One of his best friends, Celebrity Journalist Jamie Foster Brown, founder of Sister 2 Sister Magazine said, “I was shocked and sad at the same time. He was one of the most misunderstood musicians, performers, and fashion kings. I felt sorry for him in a lot of ways, because if you saw his movie, ‘Purple Rain’ you saw the pain he went through. Even though he had a lot of pain in his family relationship, he had so much to give anyway. He did give, and then he was a Jehovah’s Witness and was completely different than what he was before,” said Brown.

The music from the movie Purple Rain earned him an Academy Award and the album sold more than 13 million copies in the U.S. Playing guitars, keyboards, and drums, Prince Rogers Nelson was best known for his funk, rock, R&B, and pop, and defied all genres. He blossomed in the late 1970s and became a sex symbol, a musical genius and a pop artist who carved out his musical career in his bold fashion, often fighting with normal business practices and changing his name to the ‘Love Symbol’ to get control of his music. During his squabbles with Warner Bros music, the 14th studio album he did as a side project was called The Love Symbol Album featuring his backup band The New Power Generation. It sold five million copies.

Jamie Brown has visited Prince at Paisley Park where she peeked into his private rooms, attended late night jam sessions with Prince, Stevie Wonder and Christina Aguilera at his house in Los Angeles.

Jamie Brown has visited Prince at Paisley Park where she peeked into his private rooms, attended late night jam sessions with Prince, Stevie Wonder and Christina Aguilera at his house in Los Angeles.

“When he was bringing out a new group and a black female artist in a Los Angeles nightclub, I was sitting on some lit-up stairs leading to the stage, and all of a sudden I see this arm behind a crowd of people reaching out for me. He grabbed my arm and said, ‘can you take me out of here?’ which startled me at first, then I wrapped my arm around him and took him downstairs where other artists were sitting, and not even the body guards knew what had happened,” explained Brown. “His hands and arms were beautiful and flawlessly smooth. I was feeling his fingers and felt callouses on them from playing his guitar. He was always a mystical person.”

Jamie Brown has visited Prince at Paisley Park where she peeked into his private rooms, attended late night jam sessions with Prince, Stevie Wonder and Christina Aguilera at his house in Los Angeles. Most recently, Prince picked Jamie out of a crowd to ask for her help to get him someplace else for more privacy. For 26 years, Jamie Brown has been Publisher of the iconic Sister 2 Sister Magazine.

Jamie Brown has interviewed: Prince, Michael Jackson, Beyonce’, Dr. Dre, Rihanna, Jamie Foxx, Whitney Houston to name a few. Jamie is revered as an icon in R&B and Hip Hop music.

Prince Rogers Nelson was a hot American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, and actor. Additionally, Prince was renowned as an innovator and was widely known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, and wide vocal range. President Barack Obama, who had Prince as a White House guest last year, told the AP he and his wife “joined millions of fans from around the world” in mourning Prince’s sudden death. “Few artists have influenced the sound and trajectory of popular music more distinctly, or touched quite so many people with their talent,” Obama said in a statement. ”

Infamous film maker Kevin Smith talked about how Prince wanted to make a documentary in Paisely Park.

“He was an amazing workaholic,” said Celebrity Journalist Jamie Brown. “He was the first musician to buck against that music machine in his own output of music. I remember when he wrote ‘SLAVE’ across his face. It was a very difficult time, but Prince was strong enough, smart enough and fearless, which impressed me more than anything about him,” she said. “As for his musicality, I’m telling you I have seen many concerts, and he performed like no one else and I’ve never seen anything like it.” Brown also said, “When Prince was performing in concert, it was not just for you, but it was for him. I’m just so sad that we lost this wonder baby and wonderful child.” For more on the story and photos of Prince visited http://goo.gl/abPoEv. Feel free to leave your comments about this story and Prince below.