Young Professionals organizations

Silicon Beach Young Professionals (SBYP) expands in Santa Monica, San Diego, Orange County, and downtown Los Angeles

The fastest growing young professionals group in Southern California just got bigger.
You need to R.S.V.P. right away to get in free.

SBYP

Silicon Beach is the epicenter for the Digital Elite and a hotbed for tech start ups,” said Founder Lucas Bean of the new Silicon Beach Young Professionals (YP) (MAYO Communications images© By George S. McQuade III)

SiliconBeachYP.com
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ORANGE COUNTY
Join Us THURSDAY JULY 28TH at The Island Hotel for our OC TECH Launch Mixer RSVP HERE
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Join Us THURSDAY AUGUST 4TH at Hotel Indigo Level 9 Roof Deck for our San Diego Launch Mixer RSVP HERE
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How to reach and engage the Millennial target audience – a RTNA workshop

 RADIO T V NEWS ASSOCIATION, RTNA media workshop on Millennials.

(L-R) Britt Hysen, Editor, Millennial Mag.; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS 2/KCAL 9 TV News; KNX Business Hour Host, Frank Mottek; Judy Muller, USC professor and Paul Glickman, Senior Editor, KPCC Radio at RTNA “State of the News Business 2016: Focus on Millennials” media workshop in Beverly HIlls, CA.                                                                                 (Story was first published on Examiner.com)

Radio, TV and Media experts got a wakeup call last night (Wed., April 27, 2016), at a Radio TV News Association (RTNA) “State-of-the-Industry” workshop focusing on “Millennials”.  “If you want to target the Millennials, you have to go to them said Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder/editor-in-chief of Millennial Magazine. The magazine was named one of the “top 100 Most Influential Digital Media Sites for Millennials,” by the White House. According to the Pew Research Center and U.S. Census Bureau, Millennials, whom we define as those ages 18-34 in 2015, now number 75.4 million, jumping ahead of the 74.9 million Baby Boomers (ages 51-69). And Generation X (ages 35-50 in 2015) is projected to pass the Boomers in population by 2028. “Millennials are so bombarded with information they need a break, and if you want to get their attention, you need to go to them on their platforms,” said Hysen.

RTNA

Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder & editor-in-chief, MiLLENiAL Magazine talks about myths and reality about Millennials.

Hysen said the Millennials watch Youtube, Snapchat, Periscope, Reddit.com, Facebook Live, and Twitter to get their info, and she said they want lifestyle news, short raw stories, real human emotions, inspirational stories and posts, but 50 percent of Millennials also want hard news. Hysen also noted the younger audience wants less celebrity news. The RTNA media panel also included Moderator Frank Mottek, host, KNX Business hour; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS2/KCAL-9; Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC Radio and Judy Muller, USC Professor.

Bill Dallman, V.P. & news director, CBS2/KCAL 9 offered TV and radio newsrooms advice about hiring in TV industry jobs. “Don’t hire interns to do your social media, because you need an intern for each social media channel,” he told the RTNA event audience. “I have a lot of job candidates who want to work in the TV news business and some don’t even own a TV. All media outlets need to hire more Millennials.” All panelists agree the younger generation bring cultural and technology skills right out of school. Many have become citizen journalists. USC Professor Judy Mullen said she started a new journalism class on “critical thinking skills, where students analyze articles for logic and sources.” She also said she consider naming the course, “Detecting Crap.”

“The Millennial audience is the magic bullet that we don’t have, “said Dallman at CBS/KCAL TV. “We thought we had a situation where people growing up were our best ali, that they would want more TV news as they got older, but now we have all these apps such as smartphones, IPad, apps, computers and the Internet. Now, it’s a much bigger battle.” Thanks to the Internet and technology, TV and Radio stations have been forced to adjust making everything that goes over the air is also online. “The Internet was supposed to kill us, and it didn’t,” said Dallman. “It made us stronger, but the phone apps might kill us as we see Millennials always staring down at their phones.”

Millennials panelists

(L-R) Moderator Frank Mottek, KNX Business Hour; Judy Muller, USC Professor; Founder/Editor Britt Hysen; Bill Dallman, KCBS/KCAL TV News and Paul Glickman, KPCC Radio.

Dallman was asked about a new trends where celebrities are interviewing newsmakers like Actor/Directors like Sean Penn interviewing a Drug Lord El Chapo, and Spike Lee interviewing Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders.
“I think everyone is trying to get into the media, they want to be producers, for example Basketball Star Kolby Bryant wants to start his own production company, and they all want a piece of that pie, because that’s where the influencers are,” he explained. “They want to own the company that creates the media. It’s a natural progression for people who have been on that side of the camera most of their lives to want to be on the other side.”

Millennials focus

(L-R) Aida Mayho, Pres. & CEO, MAYO Communications, LA; Sylvia Hysen and her daughter and founder/editor Britt Hysen, MiLLENiAL Magazine at RTNA workshop.

The biggest shift in the news and media business shows that Millennials want to be part of the conversation and love audio apps like Soundcloud, but the newest hottest online trend are podcasts. “They do want to be part of the conversation,” said Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC, which is one of the first in the country to offer Podcasts of their on-air news and programs. “Millennials are the prime demographic for watching, reading and listening to the news,” said Britt Hysen. “If you don’t attract those who are in their 20’s and 30’s right now, who’s going to be watching, listening and reading in the future?”  Hysen noted that some of the biggest misconceptions about Millennials is that they’re “lazy, entitled, disenfranchised, and superficial, which is true of any generation,” she said.

“At Millennial Magazine we dispel all those misconceptions about Millennials,” explained Hysen. “We’re promoting the unsung heroes, the social impact, wellness articles, the ‘How to’ stories and cultural trends of this generation. Millennial is a media lifestyle brand showcasing global millennial influencers that reflects the habits of a conscious consumer – eco-friendly, globally connected, experience driven, and entrepreneurial,” she said. “From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree

“From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree to these opinions and observations by the media panelists feel free to weigh in with your comments. For more photos visit: https://goo.gl/hRE3r3.