SoCalJournalists

SoCalGas Co. announces annual employee award at Jeff Thorsen Memorial

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In memory of Jeff Thorsen

Friends, family and coworkers of Vice President Jeff Thorsen turned out this week to honor his legacy and celebrate his life at the Gas Company Tower. Many would agree that Thorsen ‘lost his battle with cancer,” but he never gave up and fought state IV cancer for nearly five years, a testament to his amazing resiliency.  Cancer never stood a chance against him because Thorsen was a winner and never gave up. Thorsen helped so many minority-owned business enterprises in the Supplier Diversity Div. of The Gas Company. This week’s memorial was Emceed by George McQuade III, who worked with Thorsen in Supplier Diversity Division, and who was one of his best friends.

“His unrelenting advocacy achieved many multi-billion dollar accomplishments which won strategic support for the company with key decision-makers,” said Peter Wiersma, Thorsen’s close friend, a former coworker and a consultant, Oscelola Consulting.  “He mentored many people and businesses that became multi-billion dollar enterprises. He was my brother and co-conspirator in so many changes we were always pushing for in the industry. I miss him dearly and feel a giant hole in my being.”

“Jeff never took ’NO’ for answer and we became friends over the years,” said President & CEO Dennis Orriola, Southern California Gas Company. Orriola announced at the Memorial that an annual Jeff Thorsen Leadership Award will be handed out to SoCalGas Co. employees annually in his honor and his name.

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President & CEO Victoria Gomez, SCMSDC speaks at Memorial at The Gas Company Tower.

“He was a wonderful person and it was always about you and never about him,” said Virgina Gomez, president & CEO, Southern California Minority Supplier Development Council. The Council has established a Jeff Thorsen Scholarship in his honor with a Platinum, Gold and Silver category for donations. For more contact Gomez at 213.689.6960 or email vgomez@scmsdc.org.

Former chairwoman, Gwen Moore, of the State Assembly Committee on Utilities and Commerce told the crowd at The Gas Company Tower, “Jeff never gave up and was responsible for a lot of utility industry changes.” Moore provided a glass of cider for all attending and offered a toast in Jeff Thorsen’s name. A video was also provided with photos of Thorsen and coworkers.

Other speakers included past Gas Company president & CEO, Anne Shen smith, now on the PG&E Board of Directors, Northern California; and Virgina Gomez, Southern California Minority Supplier Development Council.

Special acknowledgements went to Maurice Ortega, AM. Ortega Construction; Kevin Narcomey and Peter Wiersma, Osceola Consulting; Gwen Moore, GEM Communications; Will Johnson, Visage Energy; Leonard Ortiz, Lennova; Rick Hobbs, Anissa Arguien and Yolanda Padilla, The Gas Company; Virginia Gomez, SCMSDC; Laurie Dowling, National Utilities Diversity Council and Daryl-Lynn Roberts, Visage Energy.

Former Assemblywoman Gwen Moore leads SoCalGas Co. executives and friends who worked with Jeff Thorsen toast to his Legacy.

Former Assemblywoman Gwen Moore, chair, Committee on Utilities and Commerce leads SoCalGas Co. executives and friends who worked with Jeff Thorsen to a toast to Jeff Thorsen’s Legacy.

Thorsen was born in Bellingham, WA and moved to SoCal when he was three in 1957. While completing his education, Thorsen had several jobs where he worked in social services and for Firestone Tires. He began working at The Gas Co. in 1981 as a Customer Service Representative. He later moved to the Supplier Diversity Division where he found his true love and passion for assisting diverse businesses to grow and succeed. In 1995, Thorsen met his wife, Arlina, who also worked at The Gas Company. Thorsen is survived by his wife Arline, his stepson Robert Jaquez and his wife Melissa and their two children, Anais and Christen, his brother Jon and his wife Bonnie and their son Todd.

 

How to reach and engage the Millennial target audience – a RTNA workshop

 RADIO T V NEWS ASSOCIATION, RTNA media workshop on Millennials.

(L-R) Britt Hysen, Editor, Millennial Mag.; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS 2/KCAL 9 TV News; KNX Business Hour Host, Frank Mottek; Judy Muller, USC professor and Paul Glickman, Senior Editor, KPCC Radio at RTNA “State of the News Business 2016: Focus on Millennials” media workshop in Beverly HIlls, CA.                                                                                 (Story was first published on Examiner.com)

Radio, TV and Media experts got a wakeup call last night (Wed., April 27, 2016), at a Radio TV News Association (RTNA) “State-of-the-Industry” workshop focusing on “Millennials”.  “If you want to target the Millennials, you have to go to them said Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder/editor-in-chief of Millennial Magazine. The magazine was named one of the “top 100 Most Influential Digital Media Sites for Millennials,” by the White House. According to the Pew Research Center and U.S. Census Bureau, Millennials, whom we define as those ages 18-34 in 2015, now number 75.4 million, jumping ahead of the 74.9 million Baby Boomers (ages 51-69). And Generation X (ages 35-50 in 2015) is projected to pass the Boomers in population by 2028. “Millennials are so bombarded with information they need a break, and if you want to get their attention, you need to go to them on their platforms,” said Hysen.

RTNA

Keynote Speaker Britt Hysen, founder & editor-in-chief, MiLLENiAL Magazine talks about myths and reality about Millennials.

Hysen said the Millennials watch Youtube, Snapchat, Periscope, Reddit.com, Facebook Live, and Twitter to get their info, and she said they want lifestyle news, short raw stories, real human emotions, inspirational stories and posts, but 50 percent of Millennials also want hard news. Hysen also noted the younger audience wants less celebrity news. The RTNA media panel also included Moderator Frank Mottek, host, KNX Business hour; Bill Dallman, V.P. & News Director, CBS2/KCAL-9; Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC Radio and Judy Muller, USC Professor.

Bill Dallman, V.P. & news director, CBS2/KCAL 9 offered TV and radio newsrooms advice about hiring in TV industry jobs. “Don’t hire interns to do your social media, because you need an intern for each social media channel,” he told the RTNA event audience. “I have a lot of job candidates who want to work in the TV news business and some don’t even own a TV. All media outlets need to hire more Millennials.” All panelists agree the younger generation bring cultural and technology skills right out of school. Many have become citizen journalists. USC Professor Judy Mullen said she started a new journalism class on “critical thinking skills, where students analyze articles for logic and sources.” She also said she consider naming the course, “Detecting Crap.”

“The Millennial audience is the magic bullet that we don’t have, “said Dallman at CBS/KCAL TV. “We thought we had a situation where people growing up were our best ali, that they would want more TV news as they got older, but now we have all these apps such as smartphones, IPad, apps, computers and the Internet. Now, it’s a much bigger battle.” Thanks to the Internet and technology, TV and Radio stations have been forced to adjust making everything that goes over the air is also online. “The Internet was supposed to kill us, and it didn’t,” said Dallman. “It made us stronger, but the phone apps might kill us as we see Millennials always staring down at their phones.”

Millennials panelists

(L-R) Moderator Frank Mottek, KNX Business Hour; Judy Muller, USC Professor; Founder/Editor Britt Hysen; Bill Dallman, KCBS/KCAL TV News and Paul Glickman, KPCC Radio.

Dallman was asked about a new trends where celebrities are interviewing newsmakers like Actor/Directors like Sean Penn interviewing a Drug Lord El Chapo, and Spike Lee interviewing Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders.
“I think everyone is trying to get into the media, they want to be producers, for example Basketball Star Kolby Bryant wants to start his own production company, and they all want a piece of that pie, because that’s where the influencers are,” he explained. “They want to own the company that creates the media. It’s a natural progression for people who have been on that side of the camera most of their lives to want to be on the other side.”

Millennials focus

(L-R) Aida Mayho, Pres. & CEO, MAYO Communications, LA; Sylvia Hysen and her daughter and founder/editor Britt Hysen, MiLLENiAL Magazine at RTNA workshop.

The biggest shift in the news and media business shows that Millennials want to be part of the conversation and love audio apps like Soundcloud, but the newest hottest online trend are podcasts. “They do want to be part of the conversation,” said Paul Glickman, senior editor, KPCC, which is one of the first in the country to offer Podcasts of their on-air news and programs. “Millennials are the prime demographic for watching, reading and listening to the news,” said Britt Hysen. “If you don’t attract those who are in their 20’s and 30’s right now, who’s going to be watching, listening and reading in the future?”  Hysen noted that some of the biggest misconceptions about Millennials is that they’re “lazy, entitled, disenfranchised, and superficial, which is true of any generation,” she said.

“At Millennial Magazine we dispel all those misconceptions about Millennials,” explained Hysen. “We’re promoting the unsung heroes, the social impact, wellness articles, the ‘How to’ stories and cultural trends of this generation. Millennial is a media lifestyle brand showcasing global millennial influencers that reflects the habits of a conscious consumer – eco-friendly, globally connected, experience driven, and entrepreneurial,” she said. “From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree

“From celebrities involved in causes and CEOs disrupting industries to activists standing up for their beliefs and everyday people making a living doing what they love are the types of stories we publish.” The magazine is only online now, but they’re searching for a partner publisher to help them provide a printed magazine option. An interesting note unveiled at the RTNA workshop at the Beverly Hills Library auditorium, is the fact that many people who read Millennial Magazine are not Millennials. If you agree or disagree to these opinions and observations by the media panelists feel free to weigh in with your comments. For more photos visit: https://goo.gl/hRE3r3.